The other puppies call her the bone crusher. So tough.

asks:
I've been seeing a lot of people talk about Gus sounding really pretentious in the movie, do you think he sounds pretentious?

fishingboatproceeds:

I mean, that scene is word-for-word from the book, so don’t blame the movie! :) Yes, Gus is super pretentious at the start of the story. it’s a character flaw.

Gus wants to have a big and important and remembered life, and so he acts like he imagines people who have such lives act. So he’s, like, says-soliloquy-when-he-means-monologue pretentious, which is the most pretentious variety of pretension in all the world.

And then his performative, over-the-top, hyper-self-aware pretentiousness must fall away for him to really connect to Hazel, just as her fear of being a grenade must fall away. That’s what the novel is about. That is its plot.

Gus must make the opposite of the traditional heroic journey—he must start out strong and end up weak in order to reimagine what constitutes a rich and well-lived life.

Basically, a 20-second clip from the first five minutes of a movie is not the movie.

(Standard acknowledgement here that I might be wrong, that I am inevitably defensive of TFIOS, that it has many flaws, that there’s nothing wrong with critical discussion, and that a strong case could be made that I should not insert myself into these conversations at all.)

I was gonna write a post about this, but then John Green did it for me. Thanks John Green!

I ironically, unashamedly really enjoyed reading TFIOS. Cried and everything. Plan to see and enjoy the movie. I’m a highly educated, well-read adult, but I can also still appreciate TFIOS as the entertaining, sentimental YA novel that it is. Not everything you read has to be a “great work of literature.” Sometimes you wanna read something that’s easy and hits you right in the feelings. BAM, TFIOS.

I would also point out the target audience for the book/movie is teenage girls. Has anyone else read other romantic young adult novels? ‘Cause I read a bunch of them in high school. TFIOS at least has pretty well-rounded characters and an actual plot with character development and doesn’t idealize a creepy/abusive/illegal/whatever relationship. As far as romantic novels for teen girls go, it’s really great.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

mildhorror:

Here’s the link for more information about the PS244 fundraising campaign

Here’s the link to the GIVE IT ALL TO ME Library Collection at OutofPrintClothing.com.

Check it out! The good folks dropped me a line about this project last week, and I’m happy to boost for Library Week.

My dad just texted this to me…. obviously we’re really serious about our Judaism.

My dad just texted this to me…. obviously we’re really serious about our Judaism.

Short Term 12 (dir. Destin Cretton & Destin Daniel Crett, 2013)

A film about kids and the grown-ups who hit them.

My company distributed this film and it’s really excellent!

I’ve tried to recommend it to several people, who invariably ask, “do I need to have seen the first 11?” Nope.

nicolerosenbaum:

thegoldfishnamedcolin:

bjkaling:

10 February 2014 (1, 2, 3, 4)

MR. BARTLEY’S!!!!

NOOOOOOOOO BARTLEYS!!!!!!

ALL I WANT IN LIFE IS A TOM BRADY WITH A VEGGIE PATTY AND MAYBE A SUBSTITUTION OF ONION RINGS AGH WHY ISN’T MR BARTLEY’S IN LA?!

Just got totally thrown under the bus by another grad student critiquing something I wrote. Awesome. Glad we’re all in this together.

(Fortunately it’s something the professor already graded and the professor didn’t find half the shit to nitpick about my work that this person did. But still.)

New couch. Same dog. 

New couch. Same dog. 

Sometimes I send emojis in work emails because I’m a millennial or something. Both of my middle aged bosses think it’s hilarious to send them back to me. They might think they’re mocking me, but I think it’s really because emojis are awesome to everyone.